Character Development in Four Sisters and a Wedding

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Good character development often happens in television shows where stories are stretched out for a long period of time and characters literally and figuratively grow. This is particularly notable in American television programs where shows are created annually or in seasons.

A simple exercise in assessing character development is to put the characters in a certain environment and expect their reaction to be what you expect him or her to react based on how they are branded by the show. It is where they respond to a new stimulus without losing who they are or how they have become known to the audience.

In the case of Philippine media, a good example of effective character development isn’t found on TV. One, because television series creators are not often given the ability to plan how to unfold their stories. When the show flops, the story must end prematurely. When it succeeds, the story is extended to the point of it being ugly. Hence, the best way to see character development in Philippine media is in cinema, a medium where the creators have much more control over how to tell stories i.e., length of the film and number of characters involved.

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What makes a good film poster?

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In this episode, we talked about movie posters and their value in understanding films as well as their tie to the history of cinema. Also, we discussed how to identify good film posters and how specific film genres often employ a certain vibe and look for their film posters. Lastly, we picked certain posters from Filipino films and explained how they are effective representations of their films.

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Why is Eerie overrated?

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The genre of horror has always been looked down on in the international film scene. Critics look at horror films as crass and informal, not worthy of ‘serious’ analysis and examination. Often, they are categorized as either niche films or B movies. But for a third world country like the Philippines, where cultural workers serve as social critiques too, horror films are successful in the box office and with the critical audience. In fact, the longest-running film franchise in the country, is Shake Rattle and Roll, a horror film with 15 installments as of 2014. In this video essay, we examine a Filipino horror film that made rounds in the international film scene through its Netflix release – the 2018 film Eerie directed by Mikhail Red. We discuss how Eerie failed to fulfill two known categories in the horror genre.

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Will the Real Igorots Please Stand Up!

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The Filipino media’s relationship with the colonials is best understood through a closer look at the Igorot media. In this video essay, we look at media texts for and by the Igorots to understand concepts of resistance, post-colonialism, and media representation. Also, we touch on the subject of Philippine cinema history as we look at how the birth and development of cine in the country tie with the issues of representation faced by the Igorots.

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Jowable and the Nature of Feature-Length Films

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Jowable, like much of the films of Darryl Yap and the Vincentiments team, is undeniably problematic. It needs a closer look and examination in order to understand why it remains popular with their audience. Aside from issues of political correctness and awkward visual story-telling, Yap’s films have supported questionable politicians and ideologies. In this video essay, we identify how watching the full-length film adaptation of the short film Jowable has become more unbearable to watch. In this discussion, we touch on the nature of feature-length movies and how they may be different from online short films. You may find this discussion relevant to the current debate on the definition of cinema.

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